Christopher. Canadian.

Astronomy, Military and Humor blog.

1st August 2014

Photo reblogged from Space Child with 1,942 notes

Source: a-movie-dream

1st August 2014

Photo reblogged from The Geeky Farmer with 946 notes

robotpignet:

STS-127 Endeavour #space [processed image by http://photos.robotpig.net ] |

robotpignet:

STS-127 Endeavour #space [processed image by http://photos.robotpig.net ] |

Source: robotpignet

1st August 2014

Photo reblogged from Space Pics with 47 notes

space-pics:

The occulation of Jupiter [1000x667]http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

space-pics:

The occulation of Jupiter [1000x667]
http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

31st July 2014

Photo reblogged from starlight starbright with 4,726 notes

opticallyaroused:

Mars’ Olympus Mons, The Tallest Mountain in our Solars System, as Seen From Orbit

opticallyaroused:

Mars’ Olympus Mons, The Tallest Mountain in our Solars System, as Seen From Orbit

Source: opticallyaroused

31st July 2014

Photo reblogged from c1tylight5 (⌐■_■) with 1,037 notes

vakent:

. by plexus solaire on Flickr.

vakent:

. by plexus solaire on Flickr.

Source: vakent

31st July 2014

Photo reblogged from ☯ In The Smoke Clouds ☯ with 1,669 notes

Source: bala-dores

30th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Die Free with 10,513 notes

mstrkrftz:

2012 Perseid Meteor Shower over Denver Colorado

mstrkrftz:

2012 Perseid Meteor Shower over Denver Colorado

Source: mstrkrftz.com

30th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from ☯ In The Smoke Clouds ☯ with 4,488 notes

Source: jaegerzs

30th July 2014

Photo reblogged from We are made of stardust... with 759 notes

Source: flickr.com

30th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Penny4NASA with 148 notes

pennyfornasa:

 
“To provide for research into problems of flight within and outside the earth’s atmosphere, and for other purposes.” - National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958On July 29th, 1958 — ten months after Sputnik 1 was launched into orbit — President Eisenhower signed the National Aeronautics and Space Act. Beginning operations later that year, NASA entered the highly competitive Space Race against the Soviet Union. Culminating with the success of Apollo, the economic benefits and technological advances during NASA’s first decade were immediately felt. Since 1958, twelve astronauts have walked on the Moon, four rovers and four landers have touched down on the Martian soil, and most recently, Voyager I became the first man-made object to enter interstellar space. Perhaps the greatest achievement of this agency, however, has been the success of the International Space Station. Astronauts from various space agencies across the planet have been living and studying aboard the ISS since 2000. NASA has had a rich history, but an even more promising future awaits.Today, on the anniversary of the National Aeronautics and Space Act, join us by writing Congress to express the importance of raising the minuscule NASA budget to a level that will ensure a strong future for all humanity.Sign the petition, spread the word:www.penny4nasa.org/take-actionRead the National Aeronautics and Space Act:http://history.nasa.gov/spaceact.html

pennyfornasa:

 
“To provide for research into problems of flight within and outside the earth’s atmosphere, and for other purposes.” - National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958

On July 29th, 1958 — ten months after Sputnik 1 was launched into orbit — President Eisenhower signed the National Aeronautics and Space Act. Beginning operations later that year, NASA entered the highly competitive Space Race against the Soviet Union. Culminating with the success of Apollo, the economic benefits and technological advances during NASA’s first decade were immediately felt. Since 1958, twelve astronauts have walked on the Moon, four rovers and four landers have touched down on the Martian soil, and most recently, Voyager I became the first man-made object to enter interstellar space. Perhaps the greatest achievement of this agency, however, has been the success of the International Space Station. Astronauts from various space agencies across the planet have been living and studying aboard the ISS since 2000. NASA has had a rich history, but an even more promising future awaits.

Today, on the anniversary of the National Aeronautics and Space Act, join us by writing Congress to express the importance of raising the minuscule NASA budget to a level that will ensure a strong future for all humanity.

Sign the petition, spread the word:
www.penny4nasa.org/take-action

Read the National Aeronautics and Space Act:
http://history.nasa.gov/spaceact.html